Category Archives: Well-being

Breastfeeding…not only good for moms and babies but also good for communities

When it comes to infant feeding, many of us may have heard that “breast is best”.  The health benefits of breastfeeding to moms and babies are widely publicized and include reducing the risk of maternal postpartum depression and supporting a faster return to prepregnancy weight, reducing infant mortality and reducing the risk of the infant developing chronic health conditions including obesity and diabetes as adults.  While these benefits are certainly noteworthy, the benefits of breastfeeding extend beyond mom and baby.  

Continue reading Breastfeeding…not only good for moms and babies but also good for communities

Supporting a Culture of Well-being on Campus

What differentiates thriving organizations from organizations that languish are the people.  To support employees’ well-being and engagement, managers and supervisors must move away from focusing so much on how employees spend and manage their time, and instead support employees to manage their energy.  Energy, not time, is the most valuable of our human resources. It is “the fundamental currency of high performance” (Loehr, 2017). Check out our new resource, Employee well-being: A guide for managers and supervisors to find out more about how you can support your employees and sustain a culture of well-being on campus.

GMHEC and Your College…Partnering to Support Your Well-being

It’s no surprise that organizations who support their employees have happier, healthier, more engaged employees,  In the academic setting, one of the many benefits of high levels of faculty and staff engagement is a better student experience.   “Highly engaged faculty and staff members can make the difference between students who thrive and ones who fail to grow” (Gallup, n.d.).

While it is always essential to take action toward optimizing our personal well-being, during times of change and challenge it becomes even more essential.  We’ve all heard the saying about putting on our own oxygen mask first. To weather the curveballs that life throws at us, we’ve got to be at our best and firing on all cylinders.  Regular self-care enables us to be resilient and nimble. It ensures that we have the energy and mindset to tackle life’s challenges and have energy left for the things that are most important to us.   

One way to support our well-being is to take advantage of all of the amazing resources available at our fingertips.  Each of the GMHEC member colleges has an abundance of resources to support all five domains of well-being: physical, career, financial, social and community.  These resources include everything from financial coaching and retirement planning to physical activity classes and fitness centers to volunteer opportunities to community gardens to Consortium-wide benefits and programs.   To find out about what’s available at your school, check out the well-being resource guide for your college on the GMHEC Well-Being Resources page.  Take action today to be well and to optimize your well-being.  You can be the catalyst to transform the world around you into a world where everyone is thriving.

Well-being Resource Guides for faculty, staff and leaders

Each of the Consortium colleges offers a plethora of resources to support all five domains of well-being: career, financial, physical, social and community. We encourage you and your family to take advantage of these resources so that you can bring your best self to life and work everyday.

Join us for the GMHEC Passport to Summer Fun

Faculty, staff and family members of the GMHEC colleges are invited to get out and explore all that Vermont has to offer this summer with the GMHEC Passport to Summer Fun. From June 15th through August 15th, bring your family and friends along for the adventure as you discover new places, try a new activity, learn some new things and engage in your community.

Event details and a printable passport tracking tool are available at the Download button below. Your school and/or local library may have VT State Parks and museum passes to borrow so be sure to check out those free resources.


© 2009 David Franklin

Health….it’s not just physical.

When we hear the word health, the first thing that often pops into our minds is physical health but mental health is just as critical to our overall well-being.  Mental health is “a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and is able to make a contribution to his or her community” (WHO, 2014.).  According to a 2007 article published in American Psychologist (Keyes, 2007), mentally healthy adults reported the fewest missed days of work, low levels of helplessness, having clear goals in life, high resilience and high intimacy, the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease, the lowest number of chronic physical diseases, the fewest health limitations of activities of daily living and lower health care utilization.  

Continue reading Health….it’s not just physical.

Laughter really is the best medicine

Why couldn’t the pirate play cards? Because he was sitting on the deck! Bahahaha…..oh come on….go ahead and laugh.  April is National Humor Month so there is no better time to make a commitment to interject more laughter into our lives.  Laughing is one of the best things we can do to support our well-being and the best part is that we can actually fake it ‘till we make it when it comes to reaping the benefits of laughter.  Forced laughter is just as good for us as spontaneous laughter. So go ahead…laugh along with that sitcom, or to your favorite comedian, or those silly talking dog videos on you tube, or check out one of hundreds of free laughing yoga videos online.  It’s fun, feels good and is good for us.

Laughter, whether forced or spontaneous is good for every aspect of our well-being.  People who laugh on a regular basis have a lower standing blood pressure than does the average person. Laughter eases psychological stress, strengthens the immune system, promotes muscle relaxation, reduces pain, enhances learning, enhances oxygen flow throughout the body, relaxes blood vessels, enhances cardiac muscle conditioning, elevates mood, helps us connect with others and enhances our energy (1).  There isn’t much else that can benefit us like laughter can. Laughter is so good for us in fact, that a 2016 article in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine suggests that primary care clinicians start prescribing it to their patients (2). Can you imagine? You go to the doctor and you leave with a prescription for laughter. Now who wouldn’t want that?

To get you started on incorporating some laughter into your day, I’ll share a couple of my favorite videos….the ones that not only make me laugh out loud but that make my husband laugh at me because I’m laughing so hard. If talking dogs are up your alley you’ve got to check this video out.  It gets me every time.   Or, maybe you’ll find this video of Dennis Quaid on the Ellen Degeneres show funny.  I know I did. If you’ve got a favorite funny joke, video or meme I’d love to see it.  Send it my way at rebecca.schubert@gmhec.org.   

One out of three Americans has prediabetes and 90% don’t even know it. Could you be one of them?

November is Diabetes Awareness Month so what better time to talk about diabetes and prediabetes.  According to the CDC more than 30 million Americans have diabetes and one in three adults has prediabetes.   Ninety percent of those with prediabetes don’t even know it. The consequences of diabetes, both physical and financial can be dire.  People with diabetes are at increased risk of dementia, hearing and vision loss, heart disease, kidney failure, lower leg amputations, depression, dental decay and tooth loss, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, bone fractures and nerve pain.  As if that wasn’t enough, in Vermont diabetes is one of four chronic health conditions that is responsible for fifty percent of all deaths.   Not only do people with diabetes suffer physically but they also suffer financially.  People with diabetes spend up to 2.3 times more on their health care costs than do their healthy counterparts.   Continue reading One out of three Americans has prediabetes and 90% don’t even know it. Could you be one of them?

Emotional intelligence…the antidote to stress and the key to well-being?

Stress.  We all experience it and it seems to be getting worse.  In fact, the results of the 2017 “Stress in America” survey done by the American Psychological Association showed “a statistically significant increase in stress for the first time since the survey was first conducted in 2007” (American Psychological Association, 2017).  We’re stressed about our safety, money, our jobs, the economy and our future, and this is wreaking havoc on our health and well-being. Continue reading Emotional intelligence…the antidote to stress and the key to well-being?

Water….a critical nutrient that we may not be getting enough of

When we think of good nutrition we often think about food but we don’t often think about water.  In addition to proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, water is one of the six essential nutrients.  The adult human body is approximately sixty percent water and we cannot live without it. Water plays a key role in every body process including regulation of body temperature, joint lubrication, removal of waste products, delivery of oxygen to body tissues and is essential in the formation of saliva which starts the process of digestion (Cross, 2018).   Continue reading Water….a critical nutrient that we may not be getting enough of